DIY Turmeric Face Mask to Moisturize and Brighten Skin

turmeric face mask

Indians use turmeric for everything: food, medicine, drinks, and yes, even for face masks. This easy DIY turmeric face mask is a great at-home remedy to brighten and moisturize your face and skin.

Fun fact: turmeric is also a very important ingredient in Indian weddings – especially for a particular ceremony – the haldi. The haldi (which means turmeric in Hindi) is celebration held for the bride and groom at their respective homes. A turmeric paste is gently applied to the their face and feet. According to Hindu teachings, turmeric is supposed to cleanse the body and soul and marks the beginning of a new chapter in the lives for the couple!

There are many variations of different turmeric masks but I picked one that’s easy and convenient. You only need a few ingredients and a few minutes to put it together. FYI – whenever I share a DIY project or recipe, rest assured that it will always be pretty straightforward. Because I can’t deal with complexity.

You’ll only need 4 ingredients: turmeric, yogurt, honey, and oat flour. If you don’t have oat flour you can sub it with rice flour or gram flour, or skip it all together!

turmeric-face-mask-ingredients

 

DIY Turmeric Face Mask to Moisturize and Brighten Skin
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Ingredients
  • 1 tsp of turmeric
  • 1 tsp of honey
  • 1 tbsp of yogurt ( I used plain greek yogurt)
  • 1 tsp of oat flour (gram or rice flour works too)
Instructions
  1. Mix all the ingredients together to form a smooth paste. If the mask feels too dry you can add a little more yogurt to get the right consistency.
  2. Use a mini rubber spatula to apply the mask to your face, avoiding your eyebrows and hair. If you use your fingers to apply it, be mindful of your nails because turmeric does stain!
  3. Leave the mask on for 15-20 minutes.
  4. Wash your face thoroughly with warm water to remove the mask. You may need a couple of rinses to get it off completely. I like doing it in the shower so I don’t have to worry about staining my clothes. An old towel also helps remove the last bits of color.
  5. You can keep the mask in the refrigerator for about a week. If it starts to dry out, add a little more yogurt (or milk) to fix the consistency.
 

Now why is this so good for you? First turmeric has antiseptic and antibacterial properties. Honey has antibacterial properties as well. The lactic acid in yogurt helps remove dead skin cells and moisturizes your skin at the same time. Finally, the oat flour also acts as a gentle exfoliant & hydrates dry skin.

***A few important reminders about turmeric.

1.A slight yellow tint may remain on your face if you don’t wash thoroughly but don’t worry it’ll go away by itself.
2.Turmeric does stain clothes so beware!
3.If you have facial hair (especially if it’s light in color) don’t put turmeric on it.

 

 

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This easy turmeric face mask is made with oats, honey, yogurt and turmeric and is used to brighten and moisturize your skin

My Thoughts on the Turmeric Latte

turmeric-latte

turmeric-latte
photo credit: Kruti Shah

If you’re South Asian, it’s likely that you’ve seen this article (or a version of it) on the turmeric latte. The turmeric latte is a fancy name for what we’ve been drinking since childhood, haldi ka doodh.

I’ve had a handful of friends & family share this article with me because they know it’s very relevant to this blog.

My thoughts on it? Eh. It makes me shake my head a little but not much more than that.

Some points are a little frustrating, like how Irene Arango tells us how we should make turmeric milk (with cold pressed turmeric juice apparently). Turmeric milk is a something mothers & grandmothers have been preaching to us as long as we can remember and I feel a little uncomfortable being told how to make it by someone who didn’t grow up with it. Ya feel me?

But, in the end, I don’t think it’s worth making a fuss because we have probably taken other health trends for granted.

For example, quinoa was a staple grain in the Andean region for over 3,000 years. Kombucha has been around Asian culture since the ancient times. Matcha is a type of tea used in traditional Japanese tea ceremonies.

Let’s face it, Western culture is influenced by so many people of different backgrounds, I’m sure we’ve benefitted from the mix of different cultures it in someway without realizing. Frankly, I enjoy being able to order a Matcha Green Tea Latte from Starbucks.

I mean in the end, I think it’s ironic (oh heey Alanis Morrissette) that something we used to hate as kids is now so trendy. I spoke to another South Asian health & wellness influencer, Kruti Shah (who also took the amazing picture up top), to see what she thought and she said “Personally I think it’s so funny how it’s trendy but I’m glad a lot of people are seeing the benefits of turmeric & how great it is for the body.”

We can only be optimistic that these health trends will bring awareness to tips and tricks that have been around other cultures for centuries. Trends in health & wellness can be great as they bring us different ways to treat our mind & body. But let’s make sure to look at these trends with a critical eye.

Thoughts? Opinions? Would love to hear what others have to say.

P.S. If you like posts like these, I would be super duper happy if you can subscribe to the to the blog! Promise I won’t spam you 🙂

The turmeric latte is a new wellness trend but it's been around in Indian culture for ages. As a South Asian wellness blogger, here are my thoughts on it.

Why I created A New Blog: Citrus & Gold

Why I created CitrusGold

Hello new friends and old friends! Welcome to my new blog: Citrus & Gold. For those that know me I’ve been blogging on the side for a few years but I’ve never put as much energy into it until now. I wanted to share with you why I was motivated to start from scratch to create something completely new. I’ve shared a version of this post on my old blog, but if you hadn’t had a chance to read, here it is:

I started blogging in college to claim a little piece of the internet. You know, to have something of my own where I could freely share my thoughts. I didn’t really have a focus when I first started to blog so I wrote about whatever piqued my interest. Slowly but surely, I saw a trend: I began sharing healthy recipes, interviewing inspiring people, and writing posts related to running/ working out. The more time I invested in blogging, the more I realized I focus on the particular niche of health & fitness.

Which is why I started Citrus & Gold.

I want to inspire people to be bolder, healthier, and happier.

I’ve learned a lot about who I am as a person by focusing my energy towards my health. When I started paying more attention to my well-being, I realized that a lot of the “new habits” I was picking up were actually things my mom tried to teach me at a young age.

For example, she tried to convince me about benefits of yoga & breathing exercises; she also made me drink turmeric milk when I was sick; and she would often suggest using natural products for skincare. All of the tips & tricks she tried to teach me were rooted in South Asian culture. Though all of these may be trendy now, I want to share a perspective that brings it all close to home.

I’m excited start a new phase of my blogging “career”. The whole process definitely didn’t happen overnight: I’ve been working on planning & creating the blog little by little these past 3 months and I have big dreams for this blog!

I truly appreciate your support and would love if you could be part of the community:

1. Follow me on instagram at @citrusandgold for the latest update.
2. Subscribe here to receive a curated monthly newsletter (may change it to bi-weekly!).
3. Tell me what health & fitness topics you’d like to hear more about by asking me here or on social media!