Why Every Young Professional Should Have A Side Hustle

This post is a little more buttoned up than my usual because I actually published this on LinkedIn first. It was kind of a big deal for me for a few reasons: One, publishing on LinkedIn adds a bit more pressure because all professional eyes are on you. It’s so much easier writing posts for my blog! Two, it was my first time I publicly mentioned my blog as a “side hustle”. Sure many people knew I had a blog, but I finally confessed that it’s much more than a hobby. It takes too much damn time to be a hobby. And finally, I work full-time at LinkedIn so it’s a big deal to me talking about what I do outside of my full-time job.

Hope you enjoy!

We millennials are known to want it all. We are known to be restless and a little naive, but I don’t think that’s necessarily bad.

Our itch to do more, be more, drives us closer to our dreams and goals. Yet the desire alone isn’t enough — we have to work for it.

Many of us have turned to side hustles: part-time gigs that supplement and complement our nine-to-five, and help us get closer to our long-term career and life goals. Some of us are creating our own clothing brands, others are picking up photography, blogging, or design. For others, the side hustle may be something as simple as working at a coffee shop or driving for a ride-sharing app. No matter what the hustle may be, almost all of them are stepping stones toward a larger goal.

Personally, I’ve been working a corporate job the last few years, and I’ve recently started to invest more in my passions by finding ways to monetize them. Alongside my full-time job as an insights analyst, I also teach group fitness and run my own wellness blog.

Side hustles are extremely beneficial when you are young and new in your career for a few reasons:

1. You appreciate your full-time job way more

The more you start investing in your side hustle, the more you come to appreciate the benefits from your full-time gig! With a side hustle, you don’t get the nice perks (goodbye health insurance and 401K!), you don’t have a team to lean on, and you may not even have the luxury of an office. It’s hard running your own business, and you sometimes forget the little (and the big) things you’ve been taking for granted. It’s a very humbling process.

2. You get to be your own boss — and learn from the good and bad

So you may miss out on the comforts of a corporate job, but with a side hustle you get to have 100-percent control over you and your business, which can be both terrifying and amazing. I’ve experienced more rejection, self-doubt, and excitement with my side hustles than I ever have with my full-time job. I’ve grown both personally and professionally from these key moments and I know these learnings will help with my career down the line.

3. You diversify your skill set

Many skills you pick up a corporate setting are very applicable to your side hustles, and vice versa. For example, public speaking is a skill I’ve always wanted to perfect — I’ve tried Toastmasters and other projects at my job, and they all helped to an extent. However, through teaching group fitness, I’ve seen a bigger improvement in my public speaking skills in the last couple of months than I have in the last few years; it’s because I threw myself into a job that forces me to get better.

4. You become a pro with time management

All right, so “pro” might be a stretch, but you do get much better with your time when you have more responsibilities added to your plate (just ask any new parent!). If you want to pursue your own idea and also keep your nine-to-five, you have to find a way to make it work. That may mean scheduling everything down to the hour, waking up earlier in the morning to work on your idea, or just being more efficient with your time (ie, not checking Instagram every hour…).

5. You professional network gets even bigger

Finally, through your side hustle, you expand and diversify your network. When you grow your professional network, you have the opportunity to learn and understand different perspectives from a wide variety of people. The breadth of your network can be very valuable; you are more aware about how other people work, you understand how business is conducted in different industries, and you have a chance to make new friends!

For those of you pursuing your own side hustles, what advice/learnings do you have from your personal experience?